Item #7541 The Journey of Coronado 1540-1542 from the City of Mexico to the Grand Canon of the Colorado and the Buffalo Plains of Texas, Kansas, and Nebraska: As Told by Himself and His Followers. Coronado, George Parker Winship, Trans./Ed./Intro.

The Journey of Coronado 1540-1542 from the City of Mexico to the Grand Canon of the Colorado and the Buffalo Plains of Texas, Kansas, and Nebraska: As Told by Himself and His Followers

New York: A.S. Barnes & Company, Undated.

Undated Facsimile Edition. Hardcover. 9 1/2" X 6 1/4". xxxiv, 251pp. Mild wear to pictorial over boards with light rubbing to covers and light bumps to corners and edges. Pages are clean and unmarked. Binding is sound.

ABOUT THIS BOOK:
In 1538, Cabeza de Vaca appeared unexpectedly in Mexico, sparking interest in the distant territories through which he’d wandered. After hearing Cabeza de Vaca’s story and Fr. Marco's report in 1539, Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza outfitted a major military expedition under the command of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado to investigate the northern regions. The main body of the Coronado expedition went overland, some four hundred Spaniards and 1,300 Indian servants, slaves and other “allies” departing at the end of February 1540 with Fr. Marco as their guide. At the same time, supply ships under the command of Hernando de Alarcon sailed north up the California coast, which the Spanish mistakenly thought curved eastward, in order to replenish Coronado’s troops on the trail.

Over the next twenty-seven months, the Coronado expedition divided at times and looped back on itself, so its route is best described on the attached reference map. It first went north to Zuni/Cibola, and sent a smaller party west that stumbled upon the Grand Canyon. Another contingent, hoping to meet Alarcon at the coast, went even further west, to the mouth of the Colorado River (which Alarcon had sailed up for fifty miles), where they found messages from him but never made contact. The main part of the expedition turned east and northeast, through the pueblo country and across the Rio Grande, Pecos, Brazos, Red, and Arkansas rivers, before turning back. In little more than two years, Coronado’s troops visited and described the Southwest from Baja California to the central plains, including parts of present-day California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. En route they had contacted (and in many cases brutally oppressed) the Pima, Hopi, Zuni, Acoma, Tewa, Mohi, Keres, Tejas, Apache, and Wichita Indians. Very good. Item #7541

Price: $15.00